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Subsidy and NC Pre-K payment during COVID-19

March 18, 2020

The following information was released by the Division of Child Development and Early Education on March 17th:

Thank you for supporting our state and our families by providing vital care and services. DHHS and DCDEE understand that you are worried about the financial impact this event may have on your programs.

To address your concerns, we are making the following policy changes:

  1. Child Care Subsidy: For the month of March, all licensed child carecenters and family child care homeswill receive full subsidy payment for each child enrolled in their facility according to each child’s plan of care.
  2. NC Pre-K: Pre-K programs will be paid in full for the entire month of March, regardless of child attendance or closure.

We will assess payment policy options for future months as the need develops.  We encourage you to check your email daily and read everything we send so you have the most up-to-date information and so we have the most accurate sense of child care availability across the state.

Please let DCDEE know if you have any questions. 

COVID-19 guidance for child care settings in North Carolina

March 17, 2020

The NC Department of Health and Human Services has released Interim Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Guidance for Child Care Settings in North Carolina on March 16, 2019. Please read this guidance carefully. More information will be released as it becomes available. To receive the latest information in a timely manner, please check this website, and:

Child Care Health Consultants are available to answer questions – find the consultant for your county here. 

Coronavirus or COVID-19

March 10, 2020

The NC Child Care Health and Safety Resource Center encourages using reputable sources for information about the coronavirus including the:

As always, the most important method of preventing the spread of infectious diseases, including the coronavirus, is handwashing. Download posters from our website or from the Department of Public Health’s resource list.

 

Influenza: Plan Ahead – Flu Season is Here

October 18, 2019

Information from the Healthy Child Care Pennsylvania ECELS Program

The influenza (flu) virus is common and unpredictable. It can cause serious complications, even in healthy children. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports 136 influenza-related pediatric deaths for 2018-2019. The 2018–2019 influenza season was the longest-lasting season reported in the United States in the past ten years. Certain people are more at risk for serious flu-related complications. These include:

  • Children younger than 5 years of age, especially those younger than 2 years
  • Preterm infants
  • Children of any age with certain long-term health problems, for example, asthma or other lung disorders, heart disease, or a neurologic or neurodevelopmental disorder
  • Pregnant women
  • Older adults age 65 years and older: Immune systems decline as adults age.

The influenza vaccine is on the recommended Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) schedule and is recommended for children 6 months of age and older in child care.

The flu vaccine helps reduce serious illness and deaths that occur every year from influenza. For the 2019-20 flu season, the national American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) advises that any licensed, recommended, age-appropriate vaccine available can be administered. Flu mist is an approved form of the vaccine for this season. Some children may need two doses of flu vaccine. Get flu vaccine as soon as it is available for the current season.

Flu Vaccine for Child Care Staff  Educators and staff can help reduce the spread of respiratory illnesses like flu and colds. In addition, adult flu vaccination protects vulnerable young children in child care programs. Infants less than 6 months of age are too young to get the flu vaccine. It is especially important for everyone who comes in contact with infants to get flu vaccine. This will help protect babies from exposure to the virus.

Many people say they have had the flu when they had an uncomfortable respiratory illness. However, short, mild-to-moderate illnesses are most often caused by other seasonal viruses. Usually, influenza causes a severe and long-lasting illness. 

Link to the CDC website: Information for Schools & Childcare Providers to find information about preventing the flu as well as materials and tools for early care and education (ECE) programs and schools. Promote full participation in this year’s immunization effort for children and staff in your ECE program:

  • Consider offering flu vaccine on-site for staff.   Some pharmacies offer this service.
  • Identify a Flu Vaccine Champion. This staff member can promote the importance of vaccination for children, staff and family members. Documenting staff members that are vaccinated can be important in the event of an outbreak. Consider offering incentives such as a $5 gift card for staff who get flu vaccine.
  • Offer help if needed to find convenient locations to get the vaccine. Use the Flu Vaccine Finder. Enter the zip code or address for your location in the upper right hand box. 

 

Fall 2019 E-News – Going Viral

October 2, 2019

Going Viral” the Fall issue of the E-News includes:

  1. News from the NC Resource Center
  2. When to Exclude?
  3. Rash Decisions
  4. Child Care Providers and the Americans with Disability Act (ADA)
  5. Sniffles and Sneezes… Ahh Choo!
  6. Calendar
  7. References

Check it out!

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