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Requirement for early care and education programs to report certain diseases
Certain communicable diseases must be reported because they are considered dangerous to public health. The North Carolina Communicable Disease rules require early care and education programs to notify cases or suspected cases of reportable diseases to the local health director of the county or district in which the program is located or their designated representative. The reporting process may differ from county to county. Contact the Child Care Health Consultant in your community or the local health department (LHD) for more information. Reporting should occur as soon as possible after the disease is suspected or confirmed.

When reporting a communicable disease to the local health department (LHD), have as much of the following information available as possible:

  • full name, birthdate, county of residence, and contact information of person with communicable disease
  • name and contact information of parent or legal guardian (for a child)
  • name of communicable disease, and when symptoms started, or diagnosis was made
  • staff schedules and attendance records to determine other people who may have been exposed.

In the charts below, click on the name of the disease or condition to visit the corresponding page on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Name Of Disease/Condition (click for more information)
Diphtheria
Haemophilus influenzae (Hib) invasive disease
Influenza virus infection causing death
Measles (Rubeola)
Meningococcal disease
Meningitis, pneumococcal
Mumps
Paralytic poliomyelitis
Rubella (German measles)
Rubella Congenital Syndrome
Tetanus (Lockjaw)
Chicken pox (Varicella)
Whooping cough (Pertussis)
Tuberculosis
Novel coronavirus infection causing death

(Note: COVID-19 is no longer considered novel or "new")
Novel coronavirus infection
(Note: COVID-19 is no longer considered novel or "new")
Novel influenza virus infection
Botulism
Campylobacter infection
Cholera
Cryptosporidiosis
Cyclosporiasis
Escherichia coli, shiga toxin-producing infection
Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (caused by Shiga toxin-producing E. coli)
Foodborne disease, including Clostridium perfringens, staphylococcal, Bacillus cereus, and other unknown causes
Legionellosis
Listeriosis
Salmonellosis
Shigellosis
Trichinosis
Typhoid
Typhoid carriage (Salmonella typhi)
Vibrio infection (other than cholera)
Hepatitis A
Hepatitis B
Hepatitis B carriage
Hepatitis C, acute
Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection confirmed
Anaplasmosis
Anthrax
Arboviral infection, neuroinvasive Eastern equine encephalitis
Arboviral infection, neuroinvasive LaCrosse encephalitis
Arboviral infection, neuroinvasive West Nile virus
Babesiosis
Brucellosis
Chikungunya virus infection
Dengue
Ehrlichiosis
Hantavirus infection
Leptospirosis
Lyme disease
Malaria
Plague
Psittacosis
Q Fever
Rabies
Spotted Fever Rickettsiosis
Tularemia
Typhus, epidemic (louse-borne)
Yellow fever
Zika
Chancroid
Chlamydial infection (laboratory confirmed)
Gonorrhea
Granuloma inguinale
Lymphogranuloma venereum
Nongonococcal urethritis
Pelvic inflammatory disease
Syphilis
Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)
Acute flaccid myelitis
Candida auris
Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE)
Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease
Hemorrhagic fever virus infection
Leprosy
Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS)
Mpox
Smallpox
Vaccinia (a serious complication of small pox vaccination)
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)
Staphylococcus aureus with reduced susceptibility to vancomycin
Streptococcal infection, Group A, invasive disease
Toxic shock syndrome